Joseph the Dreamer

Joseph is born to Jacob and Rebecca.  Genesis 37.  He was a dreamer and he didn’t mind sharing his dreams, not only his brothers, but even with his father.   Rembrandt captures that moment:

Joseph Tells His Dreams to Jacob REMBRANDT (1606 – 1669)

See http://www.spaightwoodgalleries.com/Pages/Rembrandt.html for a photograph of the above etching and a description of it.

Joseph Tells His Dreams to Jacob REMBRANDT (1606 – 1669)

See http://www.artbible.info/art/large/564.html for the source of the photograph of the painting.

In each of the above works of art, Rembrandt studies various reactions of Jacob’s brother and of his father.

Of course, the result is that the brothers are jealous and get rid of Joseph by selling him to some passing slave traders going to Egypt.  Genesis 37.

Joseph is Pulled Out of the Well ANNONYMOUS (18th Century)

See http://www.artbible.info/art/large/742.html for a photograph of the above illumination.  It is particularly interesting to me because it is the work of a Muslim artist inserted into a Persian poem, despite Islamic general disapproval of artistic rendition of images, particularly those of the human body, and because it tells the story from an Islamic  point of view.   See http://www.studiesincomparativereligion.com/public/articles/Perennial_Values_in_Islamic_Art-by_Titus_Burckhardt.aspx for the source of the above photograph of the painting.

Joseph Sold by his Brothers BACCHIACCA (1494 – 1557)

See http://www.lib-art.com/artgallery/20784-scenes-from-the-story-of-joseph-joseph-sold-by-his-brethren-bacchiacca.html for the source of the above photograph of the painting.  For some biographical information on this lesser-known artist and characteristics of his style within Florentine Mannerism see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesco_Bacchiacca. The style of painting reminds me of the Twentieth Century Mexican painter, Jose Clemente Orozko, particularly of his Zapatistas, see http://www.moma.org/collection/object.php?object_id=79798, has a similar earth-tone pallette, stolid figures, and an even more heightened sense of rhythm.  Isn’t it interesting that visual art would convey a sense of rhythm, beating incessantly with a sense of resignation, in an inevitable, forced march to doom?

Links to my site:

Introduction https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/introduction/

Graphic Arts https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/i-graphic-arts/

Architecture https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/ii-church-architecture-and-its-incorporation-of-art/

Music https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/iii-music/

Theology https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/iv-theology/

Home Page https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/

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