Johannes Ockeghem (ca. 1410 – 1497)

The Franco – Flemish school flourished in the area of the Netherlands. It was known for its development of polyphonic techniques and music, particularly that of the motet in which all four voices were interesting in their own right as melodies, of generally equal weight.  Johannes Ockeghem was an early member of this school the most well-known in the last part of the 15th century. He stands as a bridge between Dufay and Josquin des Prez. He wrote chanson, which is a secular, polyphonic song in which the music supports the lyrics; but his primary output was in the form of the Mass, in about half of which he continued to use the principle of the cantus firmus.  Of those, two masses are built upon a cantus firmus based upon the melody of a chanson that he had written.  He was well known for both the quality of his technique and of his expressive affect. The design of his bass line was likely affected by his experience as a bass singer: they are particularly interesting.

See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWLsLAujZzI for the Kyrie from his Missa Prolationum.

See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NYETxriizg&feature=related for a performance by The Clerks’ Group of the entire Missa Prolationum.

 

Links to my site:

Introduction https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/introduction/

Graphic Arts https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/i-graphic-arts/

Architecture https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/ii-church-architecture-and-its-incorporation-of-art/

Music https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/iii-music/

Theology https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/iv-theology/

Home Page https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/

See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1rfnruWYWs&feature=related for an almost three hour collection of Ockeghem’s sacred music.

See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NT_fk6L0ULg&feature=related for a fascinating canonical treatment of Deo Gratias.  See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1LlWhXNu_us&feature=related for a great video effect of the same initial canonical treatment by the Hilliard Ensemble, except expanded to enhance the visual effect.  Fun!

Links to my site:

Introduction https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/introduction/

Graphic Arts https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/i-graphic-arts/

Architecture https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/ii-church-architecture-and-its-incorporation-of-art/

Music https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/iii-music/

Theology https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/2013/07/14/iv-theology/

Home Page https://bibleartists.wordpress.com/

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